Odin on Gin (1)

Introduction

Over the last decade I have had the opportunity to help dozens and dozens of craft distillers with developing and designing their gins. I want to use this thread to help lay out some of the basic guidelines I learned, that make the production of great gin quite easy and straight forward. Over the coming days (and depending on comments and my time in the factory) or weeks, I want to get most of the information (if not all) that we give on our gin making courses across.

Now, gin making has a wide set of variables. And a lot of people adhere to certain approaches. If ever you feel my approaches or opinions to be contrary to yours, let’s turn this thread into a discussion, not a battle ground. I for one will not. Just sharing info, not trying to convince anyone. Use the info or not. It’s here (or it will be) and I will share it so you can use it.

A few things on gin. Basically, let’s dive into procedures, herbs bills, distillation techniques. But I want to start with a general outline on taste. Just to make or introduce a starting point. When I make whiskey, I find the late heads, smearing into hearts, to be fruity. Front of mouth oriented. You taste them first and you taste them on your lips and the front of your tongue. The body, the grain, comes over after that. Hearts. Middle mouth feeling. Early tails, that smear into the last portion of hearts, have a nutty, root-like taste (if you give them time to develop) and are tasted at the back of your mouth towards the throat. Now, in my experience, the same holds true for a gin: it’s the fruity bits that come over first, then the body, then the root-like, nutty flavors.

So if you want to make a floral gin … don’t add root-like, nutty things to your gin recipe. And cut a bit earlier. If you want a full-bodied gin that lingers in your mouth and can be consumed neat … do add those nutty, root-like components. And cut a bit later, since these tastes come over during the last part of the run.

Okay, that was the introductionary post. More on herbs bills and aging gin and procedures in future posts!

Regards, Odin.

James and Blanaid creating beautiful spirits at the Listoke Gin School in Ireland …

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